New study highlights the benefits and challenges of education technology

The advances in education technology offer the potential to expand the access to quality education, facilitate communication, and bring opportunities to more people, but they also pose challenges because the speed and scale with which ed-tech innovations are being implemented may aggravate existing inequalities.

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Millennials still prefer pen and paper for learning

A new study found that 96% of parents think that paper is essential to their kids’ learning and that their children do well on homework when they write it down by hand. The report also lists some of the benefits of reading on paper, arguing that it allows you to better concentrate on the material, which improves how well you remember and recollect it".

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Humanizing distance education

Personalized and immediate attention is an area of opportunity that many education-oriented technology institutions and companies have begun to explore. The Project “Avatar Professor”, a telepresence model developed at Tecnológico de Monterrey, offers the experience of having a professor in holographic form in the classroom, providing virtual mobility from anywhere in the world with real-time, personalized interaction with students, delivering a social presence in the classroom. 

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Paving the way for refugee education: SNHU granted online degrees to students living in refugee camps

Despite their potential, young refugees are greatly disadvantaged in accessing university education: Only 1 percent of refugees attend university, compared to a global average of 34 percent. Today, Southern New Hampshire University is paving the way as one of the first American institutions to grant online degrees to students living in refugee camps.

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Teachers fail to innovate due to “fear of looking stupid”

Despite being a leader institution on research into how students learn best, Carnegie Mellon University has largely failed to adopt its own findings. To find out why, anthropologist Lauren Herckis observed Carnegie Mellon University scholars for more than a year. Her conclusion was surprising: Teachers are too afraid of looking stupid in front of their students to try something new. 

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