Computer Science Education Week and the 50th anniversary of kids learning to code

Computer Science Education Week and Google doodle coding game

CSEdWeek goal is to spread the word across the globe about the importance of computer science and coding at all educational levels

The Computer Science Education Week (CSEdWeek) aims to inspire students to take interest in computer science. This year marks the 50th anniversary since computer programming was first introduced to kids and Google celebrates it with its first coding-game doodle: “Coding with Carrots.”

Computer Science Education Week

The Computer Science Education Week goal is clear: spread the word across the globe about the importance of computer science and coding at all educational levels. Non-profit organizations are joining the effort and campaigns such as "Hour of code" are encouraging everybody to learn the basics of computer programming. Furthermore, companies like Microsoft and Google, are funding programs to bring coding to libraries and schools. They envision coding as a necessary skill for the jobs of the future.

Source: Flickr.

Source: Flickr.

In this year's CSEdWeek, Apple is inviting anyone to its "Hour of Code" courses in most of Apple stores all over the world. Microsoft's Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation just donated $12 million to Code.org. Furthermore, Google doodle created a fun coding game called “Coding with Carrots.”

“Coding with Carrots”

In 1967, Seymour Papert and MIT researchers developed Logo, the first math game that worked inputting commands that would direct an on-screen electronic turtle. 50 years later, Google Doodle teamed up Google Blocks and MIT researchers to create "Coding with Carrots," a visual programming game that teaches its users how to code in an easy and fun way.

“Coding with Carrots” works using coding blocks. Google asks users to help a bunny collect carrots. Over the course of six levels, the game introduces complex concepts like loops and to solve problems using the fewest number of commands possible.

Source: Flickr.

Source: Flickr.

Start coding. You can take one-hour tutorials; you can visit an Apple store this week, or you can just practice with this week’s Google’s doodle.