Parents overestimate their kid’s performance in math and reading, according to survey

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Nine in ten parents think their child is performing at or above grade level in math and reading, but data of the National Assessment of Educational Progress shows that only one third of students are proficient on those subjects.

A survey released by Learning Heroes reveals that nine in ten parents in the United States—across race, income, and education levels— think their child is performing at or above grade level in math and reading.

But the optimism of parents contrasts with data provided by the National Assessment of Educational Progress, which shows that only one third of students are proficient on those subjects.

The survey report “Parents 2017: Unleashing Their Power & Potential” states that parents place more importance on emotional well-being than on academic track.

Among the key findings of the study are:

  • Nine in 10 parents believe their child is performing at or above grade level in math and reading, despite NAEP data that shows only one in three 8th graders are proficient in math and reading.
  • 77 percent of parents believe their children are getting a good education and 66 percent say they are doing above average academically.
  • 86 percent of parents rely on report card grades to know if their child is achieving at grade level.
  • Among Spanish-dominant parents, the number who say their child's school provides a excellent/pretty good education drops to two-thirds, and four in five worry about their child being on track with the expectations of his or her grade
  • 72 percent of parents feel it is important—and 75 percent of parents expect— their children will get a two- or four-year college degree.
  • Three of five parents give greater importance to their children being happy and not overly stressed than doing well in school.