Instant learning

By Martha Elena Nuñez López
martha.nunez@itesm.mx

Today, higher education is facing the challenge of a globalized environment and a growing need to innovate in teaching-learning processes in order to produce the professionals demanded by the changing world of work. At the same time, the challenge has arisen of efficiently integrating new technologies into education and learning spaces that foment autonomy, collaboration and connection with the world.

In the future, a new way of producing significant experiences for students will be through instant learning, also known as “ultrafast cognition” or “learning in a parallel dimension”. Right now, there are still many linear limitations of time and connection, although several types of software have already been proposed, including “Deep 3D”, which is a space where all the course content is available in one place for teachers and students, who can make a personalized manual selection of the materials they need.

A new way of producing significant experiences for students will be through instant learning, also known as “ultrafast cognition” or “learning in a parallel dimension.”

The brain’s optical-visual power is exploited to favor instant comprehension and foster visual memory, through the use of software that converts augmented reality devices into "Right-Brain” devices, such as a holographic system employed to capture everything the user does digitally. In this way, a new type of tridimensional optical depth is created to perceive a sensation of immersion and high precision. Its optical positioning system transforms web content into a tridimensional format.

Experts suggest that such neuronal and behavioral transition moments could correspond to moments of instant learning.

Several interesting discoveries have been made about instant learning: many species learn new things on the basis of trial and error. But, is this learning process gradual or does it happen suddenly? Research undertaken by the University of Heidelberg in Germany, in conjunction with the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, consisted of placing electrodes in the region of the brain called the prefrontal cortex in rats. Then, they observed neuronal activity patterns while the rats learned a new rule to obtain a food reward. In many cases, a brusque change in neuronal activity corresponded to a change in the strategy used by the animal. Experts suggest that such neuronal and behavioral transition moments could correspond to moments of instant learning.

At the end of the experiment, the learner pilots proved to have improved their skills by 33% in relation to the control group, whose caps were deactivated.

Moreover, scientists from HRL Laboratories in the United States have shown that they are on the brink of turning instant learning into a reality. They have created a system that allows novice pilots to learn to fly based on the experiences of expert pilots. The system recorded the brain activity of six widely experienced pilots and then their brain patters were transmitted to 32 trainee pilots over four consecutive days, through electrode caps that generated small discharges with the brainwaves of the expert pilots. At the end of the experiment, the learner pilots proved to have improved their skills by 33% in relation to the control group, whose caps were deactivated. Scientists placed these novice pilots in flight simulators and proved that those who had received the brainwaves were capable of performing maneuvers with more median G-force than the others, and displayed greater confidence without having any actual experience. It is worth noting that since the study does not measure the effects of the experiment over time, it has not proved with absolute certainty whether the pilots have really learned something.

The teaching-learning process poses new challenges in the 21st century, with the dramatic changes in technology, the use of social networks and globalization.

The teaching-learning process poses new challenges in the 21st century, with the dramatic changes in technology, the use of social networks and globalization. The time has come to question the educational practices that we, as teachers, have continued to implement out of tradition. Teachers need to search continuously for ways to foster learning in our students and to constantly keep abreast of the latest educational trends and new technological resources available.


About the author:  

Martha Elena Núñez López, has earned two Master’s degrees, one in Industrial Design and the other in Construction Engineering and Management. She is the National Coordinator of the Architecture, Art and Design Academies, and also teaches the course Design Experiences at Tecnológico de Monterrey, campus Puebla.